Posts Tagged "landscape"

Mt. Shasta

Posted on Oct 28, 2014 in Blog

Mt. Shasta is such a spectacular place. Since it was the last time of the year to catch the Milky Way, I thought it would be a great time to not showcase the mountain itself, but the skies above. Enjoy!

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Fall in Love with Film Again – Voigtländer Bessamatic SLR Test

Posted on Oct 12, 2013 in Blog, Projects

Fall in Love with Film Again – Voigtländer Bessamatic SLR Test

For my etsy store, Cool Vintage Cameras, testing is one of the most important part of making sure the camera is fully operational. I recently came across a Voigtländer Bessamatic 35mm SLR Camera that is in near mint condition.  For this test, I used the in-camera light meter for accuracy & the results were quite impressive. Here is some background info about the Bessamatic before the gallery.

The Bessamatic was launched by Voigtländer in 1959, a few years after the 1953 Contaflex and the 1957 Retina Reflex, all from Germany. This is by far the biggest and heaviest of these three leaf-shuttered SLR cameras, at more than 2 lbs. or 0.935kg. The late arrival on the market had helped Voigtländer improve the ergonomic design taking advantage of previous designs. Nevertheless, it has all the shortcomings found on these cameras, the finder blackout after exposure and the limited range of interchangeable lenses.

The Bessamatic is easy to handle and the controls are sound and reliable. The shutter is the behind the lens SLR Synchro-Compur, as found on its fellow competitors, with the EV cross-coupled shutter speed and aperture rings. The viewfinder is bright and the focusing screen has a split image rangefinder, probably the same as found in contemporary Contaflex cameras. The focusing ring is at the front of the lens. The selenium meter cell window is above the lens, in front of the finder prism where it out of the way for light-obstructing fingers. The light meter needle is visible to the right in the viewfinder, as is a follower pointer with a small circle at the tip. They are easily brought to coincide using the large aperture-control knob under the smaller rewind knob.

The camera has a sturdy wind-on lever at the right-hand side with a flimsy film reminder in the hub. Next to it is the shutter release and the rewind release lever. At the left-hand side is the rewind knob at top of the large aperture knob. A small lever on the left-hand side of the shutter housing have settings for M and X flash synchronisation, as well as V for self-timer, shifted when a small button is depressed on the opposite side of the shutter housing.

The camera back is opened by pushing two small latch buttons against each other using two fingers. The rewind knob is fully extended to load the film cassette. The only quite unusually odd thing about this camera is the frame counter, not the readout itself situated quite conveniently at the back, – below the wind-on lever, but the way in which it is reset. To set it, the film advance sprocket drum, next to the take-up spool, must be turned, using the thumb at the ridged middle part until reaching the desired number. It is difficult, time consuming and not very practical. Otherwise, the interior is beautifully finished and the film easily loaded.

The lenses available for the Bessamatic are quite comprehensive, ranging from 35mm to 350mm and are considered as being of superior quality, but rather expensive second hand, since not easily found. The Bessamatic is often associated with the first 35mm zoom lens, the 36 to 82mm f/2.8 Zoomar made by the Zoomar Corporation of USA.

If you would like to purchase the camera click here

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Ipswich River Wilflife Preserve

Posted on Jan 15, 2013 in Blog, Projects

Spent the last two days exploring my old stomping grounds, the Ipswich River Willdlife Preserve.

The Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary, which is the Massachusetts Audubon Society’s largest wildlife sanctuary, is located in Topsfield and Wenham, Massachusetts. Much of its 2,800-acre (11 km2) landscape was created by a glacier 15,000 years ago. The park’s more than ten miles (16 km) of interconnected trails wind through forests, meadows, and swamps, vernal pools, drumlins, and eskers. The sanctuary’s Rockery Trail runs beside large rocks, exotic trees, and shrubs that belonged to an arboretum at Bradstreet Farm, parts of which were donated by owner Thomas Emerson Proctor. The Ipswich River runs for eight miles (13 km) through the sanctuary, and Mass Audubon makes canoes available for members to rent. The Sanctuary also offers summer camps and various nature programs for children and adults.

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Lockwood Lane Revisited

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 in Blog

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Superlapse Cinemagraph (gif)

Posted on Jan 11, 2013 in Blog, Projects

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